Articulation and Transfer Credit Policy- Appendix A

    Appendix A:  University of Saskatchewan

    Student Mobility Terminology

    As a principle, the University of Saskatchewan will align, where possible, with national student mobility terminology to ensure a common language for discussion and activity related to transfer credit and transfer credit agreements.  The primary source for definitions will be the Canadian Information Centre for International Credential (CICIC) English Terminology Guide for Academic Credential Assessment in Canada, and the Pan-Canadian Consortium on Admissions & Transfer (PCCAT)/Association of Registrar’s of the Universities & Colleges of Canada (ARUCC) Transfer Credit Nomenclature project.  This document incorporates and replaces the Student Mobility Terminology document approved by the academic programs committee of Council on May 23, 2012.

    Transfer Credit Terminology

    Articulation

    Articulation is a process by which institutions assess learning acquired elsewhere in order that credit toward their own credential may be provided.  Articulation is based on faculty decisions and established institutional principles, policies and procedures.  It acknowledges the missions of different types of institutions and the quality and integrity of their programs.  Transfer credit is the result of the articulation process.

    Block Transfer

    The process of granting of credit for a group of completed courses from one institution to another without requiring course-by-course assessments.  The most common example would be granting a block of 30 to 60 transfer credits for a completed postsecondary diploma at a recognized institution.  Block transfer credit assessments establish and recognize that diploma graduates possess the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to succeed in upper year courses at the receiving institution.

    Course-by-Course Transfer

    The process of granting credit for a course (or courses) from one institution to another by completing a comparison of course content and learning outcomes for each individual course.  Credit may be awarded for a specific U of S course (or courses), non-specific credit for a subject area, or an elective at the junior-level, senior-level, or unspecified-level.

    Laddering

    Seamless movement of a student between certificate, diploma and degree studies with no or limited loss of coursework.   Typically a student would complete two years in a diploma program and then move into a degree program, completing their studies in an additional two years. 

    Learning Outcomes

    Represent the knowledge, skills, competencies, and abilities that a student has attained and is able to demonstrate as a result of successfully completing a particular set of educational experiences.

    Learning Pathways

    Different routes that individuals choose to progress into, within, and out of the postsecondary education system.  Learning pathways are used to describe the recognized mobility options available to different learners.

    Mobility

    The ability for students to move freely from one jurisdiction to another and to gain entry into an academic institution, trade or profession without undue obstacles or hindrances.

    Recognized Post-Secondary Institution

    A public or private institution that has been given authority to grant degrees, diplomas, and other formal credentials by a public or private Act of the provincial/territorial legislature or through a government-mandated quality assurance mechanism or accrediting agency.

    Transfer Credit (Credit Transfer)

    Courses taken by a student at one post-secondary institution (the sending institution) that are transferred to another postsecondary institution (the receiving institution).  Transfer credit is sometimes also called credit transfer or advanced standing.  The U of S accepts, for transfer of credit, courses from recognized institutions in Canada and internationally.  The purpose of transfer credit is to give students fair and reasonable credit for academic work, which has been undertaken at another institution, and to reduce the likelihood of a student repeating academic work for which the student has already demonstrated competence.

    Transfer Credit Agreement (Articulation Agreement)

    An agreement between two institutions that authorizes studies undertaken at one institution to be credited toward studies undertaken at another institution.  Transfer credit agreements can be bilateral (with each institution agreeing to recognize the other’s courses) or one-way.  Transfer credit can be established on a course-by-course or block transfer credit basis.

    2+2, 1+3, and 3+1 Agreements

    A type of block transfer credit agreement between the U of S an another academic institution which allows a student to complete 1, 2 or 3 years at the sending institution and the balance of coursework at the U of S.  This type of agreement goes beyond a basic transfer credit agreement because it specifies that the completion of specific courses, or completion of a specific credential, will fulfill the requirements of a particular program at the U of S.  Students would receive their final credential from the U of S.

    Program Terminology

    Joint Degree Program

    A student pursues a degree at both the University of Saskatchewan and another post-secondary institution, with the student receiving only one degree at the end of the program either from the University of Saskatchewan or from the partner institution. The University of Saskatchewan parchment, if awarded, and transcript reflect the joint nature of the program. The degree can be at the undergraduate or graduate level.

    Joint Student Program

    A student pursues a graduate degree from another university, with a portion of their research and/or course work being completed at the U of S. The student receives only one degree and it is from the partner university. This is also sometimes referred to as a Sandwich Program.

    Dual Degree Program

    A student pursues a degree both at the University of Saskatchewan and another post-secondary institution, with the student receiving two degrees at the end of the program, one from the University of Saskatchewan and one from the partner institution. The University of Saskatchewan parchment and transcript reflect the dual nature of the program. The degree can be at the undergraduate or graduate level. The student must complete the degree requirements of both institutions.

    Cotutelle Program

    A French legal term for a PhD program offered jointly by two higher education institutions: one in France and one elsewhere. The degree is jointly awarded and recognized by both institutions. It can be for dual degree programs or joint degree programs. Students are jointly supervised by faculty at each institution and they attend the universities alternately.

    References

    Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials (CICIC). English Terminology Guide for Academic Credential Assessment in Canada. http://terminologies.cicic.ca/app/

    Council of Ministers of Education (CMEC) Working Group on Credit Transfer. In 2002, the CMEC Working Group on Credit Transfer was established to develop pan-Canadian strategies on credit transfer between colleges and universities among provinces and territories. Every year, each jurisdiction reports on progress in its credit transfer systems and articulation agreements within its post-secondary sectors. These reports are available on the CMEC website:

    www.cmec.ca/163/Programs-and-Initiatives/Postsecondary-Education/Credit-Transfer

    Joint and Double Degree Programs in the Global Context

    http://www.iie.org/Research-and-Publications/Publications-and-Reports/IIE-Bookstore/Joint-Degree-Survey-Report-2011

    Ministerial Statement on Credit Transfer in Canada. In 2002, the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC) approved a strategy to improve credit transfer systems and promote mobility for students across Canada. As part of the strategy, CMEC endorsed and released a Ministerial Statement on Credit Transfer in Canada that sets out expectations for credit transfers to guide institutions, students, and governments.

    Pan-Canadian Consortium on Admissions and Transfer (PCCAT). The Pan-Canadian Consortium on Admissions and Transfer (PCCAT) is a membership-based organization intended to bring together stakeholder post-secondary institutions across Canada. PCCAT meets annually to bring together experts in the field of student mobility. Further information can be found on the PCCAT website: http://www.uwindsor.ca/pccat/

    Pan-Canadian Protocol on the Transferability of University Credits. At their meeting from August 30 to September 1, 1994, provincial premiers endorsed the CMEC proposal to work with partners on an action plan to increase accessibility, equity, and mobility for postsecondary students, and agreed that CMEC should consider the feasibility of setting a target date for the recognition of postsecondary credits across Canada. In July 2009, the statement was updated and approved by ministers of post-secondary education in each Canadian jurisdiction. The statement lists six principles recognizing that credit transfer can occur between different types of post-secondary institutions, and that there is variation in credit transfer agreements between provinces and territories. Each Canadian jurisdiction has made progress in its credit transfer system. Those with the most well-developed transfer systems are the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT), and the Alberta Consortium on Admissions and Transfer (ACAT).

    Western Canadian Consortium on Admissions and Transfer (WestCAT). WestCAT is a voluntary consortium whose purpose is to encourage and facilitate inter-provincial access, mobility, and transfer of credits for students moving among the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. Its work is guided by the principles stated in the Council of Ministers of Education (CMEC) (2009) Ministerial Statement on Credit Transfer in Canada and is compatible with the mandate and role of the Pan-Canadian Consortium on Admissions and Transfer (PCCAT). Membership includes government, council, and/or institutional representatives as determined by each province.

    Australian Qualifications Framework - AQFC Project to develop a Common Terminology for Credit Transfer and Articulation

    http://www.csu.edu.au/acad_sec/academicsenate/docs/CSU_Submission_to_MCEETYA_Project.pdf