Academic Courses Policy on Class Delivery, Examinations, and Assessment of Student Learning

Academic Affairs

Responsibility: University Registrar
Authorization: University Council
Approval Date: Jun 18, 2015

Revisions

Permit the first day of final examinations to be one day after the last day of lectures (approved January, 2012)

Delete the Withdraw Fail grade effective May 1, 2012 (March, 2012)

Revise Course Syllabus section;  additional section on Class Recordings (March 2013)

Updates:

Incorporate terminology used in the University Council policy on  Student Appeals of Evaluation, Grading and Academic Standing and the Procedures for Student Appeals in Academic Matters (December 2012)

Incorporate Nomenclature Report terminology on courses and classes (March 2012).

Purpose

The purpose of the Academic Courses Policy is to prescribe university-level requirements for delivery of academic courses, and the assessment of student learning including conduct of examinations.

Principles

One of the primary purposes of a University is to optimize learning opportunities for students. The University encourages and celebrates innovation in class delivery and student assessment.

Assessment of student learning should be an effective, fair and transparent process which follows University, College and Department regulations so that students across the institution are treated respectfully and impartially. This includes accommodation for students with disabilities, in accordance with University policies and provincial legislation.

As articulated in the University Learning Charter, students will be provided with a clear indication of what is expected in the class, and what they can do to be successful in achieving the learning objectives of the course. Assessments of student learning will be transparent, applied consistently, and congruent with course objectives. Students will receive prompt and constructive feedback on their learning progress regularly throughout the class.

Scope of this Policy

This document incorporates all of the policies, regulations, and procedures relating to class delivery and student assessment which have been previously approved by University Council in various policy documents and reports.

It supersedes the following documents previously approved by University Council:
April, 2009 Academic Programs Committee Examination Regulations
April, 2001 Academic Programs Committee policies for final grades reporting
January, 2001 Academic Programs Committee Retroactive Withdrawal Policy
September, 1986 – University of Saskatchewan Grading policy

It complements and maintains the principles expressed in the following documents:

June, 1999 Guidelines for Academic Conduct
June, 2007 Teaching and Learning Committee Student Evaluation of Instructors/Courses
December, 2009 Use of Materials Protected by Copyright  
June, 2010 University Learning Charter
June 2011Nomenclature Report
January, 2012  Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities
Student and Enrolment Services Division Instructors and Staff Handbook 
Information and Communications Technology Lecture Capture

All regulations covering class delivery, student assessment and examinations have been developed into a framework with three levels of authority and responsibility: University, College and Department. Within the framework of this policy, Departments and Colleges may develop additional regulations and procedures for class delivery and student assessment. For example, Colleges and Departments may develop their own template for the syllabus to be used by their instructors.

In Colleges where there is an alternate approved academic calendar, regulations covering student assessment and examinations shall be developed by the College in a manner consistent with these University regulations.

All references to “Department Heads” and “Deans in non-departmentalized Colleges” in this document would also equally apply to their delegates.  All references to “Departments” and “Colleges” would also equally apply to Schools.

Policy

The University of Saskatchewan Academic Courses Policy on Class Delivery, Examinations and Assessment of Student Learning covers policies, regulations, and procedures governing the following aspects of class delivery and student assessment, including the conduct of examinations.

Section I. Class Delivery

1 Class Syllabus
1.1 Content of the syllabus
1.2 Changes to the syllabus after distribution
1.3 Change of final examination date
1.4 Due dates in the week of classes before the final examination period

2 Contact Hours and Availability of Instructors
2.1 Availability of instructor

3 Student Attendance
3.1 Permission to attend and participate in classes
3.2 No credit unless registered

4 Class Evaluation by Students

5 Class Recordings
5.1 Privacy, permission and consent
5.2 Intellectual property and copyright
5.3 Accommodation for students with disabilities
5.4 Definitions
5.5 Responsibilities of instructors and presenters
5.6 Responsibilities of students
5.7 Restrictions on use of classroom recordings
5.8 Storage and Archiving
5.9 Special circumstances: clinics, training, art classes

Section II. Assessment of Students

6 Grading System
6.1 Fairness in evaluation
6.2 Weighting in class grades
6.3 Grade descriptors
6.4 Academic grading standards
6.5 Average calculations
6.6 Grading deadlines

7 Examinations
7.1 Methods and types of examinations
7.2 Mid-term examinations
7.3 Final examinations
a. Modification of requirement to hold a final examination
b. Final examination period and scheduling
7.4 Conduct and invigilation of examinations
a. Invigilation
b. 30 Minute Rule
c. Identification
7.5 Access to materials in the examination room
7.6 Permission to Leave the Examination Room
7.7 Food and Beverages
7.8 Protocols for an Academic Misconduct Breach
7.9 Retention and Accessibility of Examination Papers
7.10 Retention of the exam materials during the examination
7.11 Additional invigilation standards

8 Student Assessment Issues and Special Circumstances
8.1 Final grade alternatives and comments
8.2 Withdrawal
8.3 Retroactive Withdrawal
8.4 Incomplete class work (assignments and examinations) and Incomplete Fail (INF)
8.5 Deferred final examinations
8.6 Supplemental final examinations
8.7 Aegrotat standing
8.8 Special accommodations for disability, pregnancy, religious, and other reasons.

9 Procedures for Grade Disputes
9.1 Grade dispute between instructor and department head or dean
9.2 Grade dispute between instructor and student

Authority and Responsibility

Under the Bylaws of University Council (Section 3, VIII, 2), all matters respecting the subjects, time and mode of the examinations and respecting the degrees and distinctions to be conferred by the University shall be provided for by University Council regulations.

Academic regulations at all levels shall be publicly accessible to all members of the University community. If a College or Department has additional regulations, these must be made available to students through publicly accessible websites.  Additionally, it must be communicated to students that additional regulations exist. There should also be provisions at each level of authority for periodic review and amendment of these regulations.

University:
University regulations will prevail in the absence of other College or Departmental regulations. In the case of a discrepancy between University regulations and College or Departmental regulations, University regulations will take precedence. Any College requesting an exception, change or addition to these Regulations is to submit a proposal to the Academic Programs Committee of University Council for approval.

Colleges and Departments:
University Council, while retaining the final authority over assessment of student learning, delegates to Colleges the responsibility of establishing general policies concerning the methods and types of assessment which may be employed by the Departments of that College, and each Department should establish any further instructions and policies for its members as necessary.

Instructors and Departments:
It is the responsibility of the instructor and Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized college, or those delegated such responsibility by them, to report final grades to the Registrar in accordance with the regulations outlined here. Instructors will use prescribed grade descriptors or grade comments if required.

The final grade report, prepared by the instructor, must be submitted to and approved by the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges.


Section I. Class Delivery

The Teaching and Learning Foundational Document encourages alternative approaches to class delivery such as improved information communication technologies, experiential learning opportunities, and self-learning strategies.    Regardless of methodology, there are universal elements of class delivery that ensure appropriate learning opportunities are provided to the students of the University.

1.  Class Syllabus                

Department heads, and Deans in non-departmentalized Colleges, are accountable for the maintenance of academic standards and relevancy of programs of their department and college.

The syllabus is a public document that provides details about a particular class for both potential and enrolled students.  It is useful for recruiting prospective students and sharing information about University classes with the broader community (for example, for the purposes of transfer credit evaluation). Instructor syllabi must be submitted to Department Heads, or Deans in non-departmentalized Colleges, prior to the start of a class.

It is recommended that students also have online access to syllabi prior to the beginning of the class.  After submission to the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized colleges, syllabi should be posted on the Blackboard Open Courseware site and/or publically accessible departmental or other websites. Instructors who post their syllabus on publically accessible websites may wish to redact certain information that is not related to the core instruction of the class (e.g. personal contact information, names and contact information for teaching assistants, material protected under copyright, etc.). 

1.1 Content of the syllabus:

Instructors shall review the contents of the class syllabus with their students at the beginning of the class.  The syllabus shall include the following:

  • type and schedule of class activities;
  • if the class is offered online, through distance learning, or off-campus, any additional or different expectations around any class activities and requirements;
  • expected learning outcomes or objectives for the class;
  • the type and schedule of term assignments;
  • the type and schedule of mid-term or like examinations;
  • notice if any mid-term examinations or other required class activities are scheduled outside of usual class times, with College permission;
  • the length of the final examination in hours as well as its mode of delivery;
  • relative marking weight of all assignments and examinations;
  • consequences related to missed or late assignments or examinations;
  • whether any or all of the work assigned in a class including any assignment and examination, or final examination, is mandatory for passing the class, or whether there are any other College-level regulations that specify requirements for passing the class
  • attendance expectations if applicable, the means by which attendance will be monitored, the consequences of not meeting attendance expectations, and their contribution to the  assessment process;
  • participation expectations if applicable, the means by which participation will be monitored and evaluated, the consequences of not meeting participation expectations, and their contribution to the assessment process;
  • experiential learning expectations if applicable, the means by which experiential learning will be monitored and evaluated, the consequences of not meeting experiential learning expectations, and their contribution to the assessment process;
  • contact information and consultation availability;
  • course or class website URL, if used;
  • notice of whether the instructor intends to record lectures and whether students are permitted to record lectures
  • explanation of Copyright where it relates to class materials prepared and distributed by the instructor
  • location of the Academic Courses policy as well as the regulations and guidelines for both academic and non-academic misconduct and appeal procedure;
  • information regarding support services that are available to students through the Student and Enrolment Services Division, Student Learning Services at the University Library, and the Colleges.

Instructors are encouraged to use the University of Saskatchewan Syllabus Template and Guide to assist with satisfying the above requirements.

1.2 Changes to the syllabus after distribution:

After distribution, a syllabus may only be changed if no student in the class objects to such changes and the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, is notified.  Otherwise, methods and modes of assessment for all assignments and examinations must remain as stated in the syllabus: no major graded assignment or examination is to be newly assigned in a class and no changes to already set dates or the stated grade weighting of graded assignments or examinations is permitted. 

1.3 Change of final examination date: 

Once the Registrar has scheduled final examinations for a term, instructors wanting to change the date and/or time of their final examination must obtain the consent of all students in the class according to procedures established by the Registrar, as well as authorization from the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges.

2.  Contact Hours and Availability of Instructors  

As per Nomenclature, a “traditional” three credit unit lecture course involves approximately 39 direct lecture hours, and a course can involve a further equivalent contact time in student consultations and/or tutorial or laboratory sessions.

2.1 Availability of instructor:

Instructors should make it known to the students through the class syllabus how they can be contacted to arrange for one-on-one consultation about class material.  These need not be face-to-face meetings but can include, for instance, responses to queries through email or other electronic media. Instructors should inform students about how quickly they can expect an email response to any enquiry.

It is recognized that there is a growing trend to develop and deliver non-traditional courses, including practicum laboratories, capstone design, community-service learning, and Internet-based courses.  For equivalent credit units, it is expected that both the instructors and students of these classes will regard the interaction, instructor availability and class workload to be equivalent to that of a traditional lecture class.

 3.  Student Attendance            

Regular and punctual attendance in their classes is expected of all students (including lectures, seminars, laboratories, tutorials, etc.). 

Attendance expectations apply equally to classes offered in a physical classroom, online, or through distance learning, though the practical requirements of attendance may be defined differently in each instance.

Any attendance requirement that may result in grade penalties or other consequences must be explicitly stated in the syllabus.

3.1 Permission to attend and participate in classes:

No person may gain the full benefit of instruction in a class without being duly registered in the class either as a credit or audit student. Instructors must advise students who are not on their class list that they need to be registered for their class, either as a credit or audit student

Instructors may invite visitors to attend a class for pedagogical and other reasons related to the delivery of the class (for example, guest lecturers, professional observers or mentors, teaching or marking assistants, laboratory or tutorial assistants, and so forth).  

Instructors of an online class may, at their discretion, open their class to a broader set of participants (including those not registered as students) provided that non-registered participants are not using software or materials limited by licence for use by students.  Instructors shall not grade any work of such non-registered participants in these online courses.  Retroactive registration or credit challenge by such non-registered participants will not be permitted. 

3.2 No credit unless registered:

Only students who are registered in a class can receive credit for a class.

4.  Class evaluation by students       

Improvement of class delivery is an on-going responsibility of all instructors.  Student feedback is an important source of information to help guide instructors in their search for improved delivery mechanisms.   

At the University, all classes will be evaluated by students on a regular basis using an approved evaluation tool.  All instructors have the responsibility to ensure that students have access to such an evaluation tool.

Department Heads, or Deans in non-departmentalized Colleges, shall ensure that a process exists for instructors to receive student evaluations on a regular basis, and for arranging an opportunity for constructive discussion of the evaluation as required.  This discussion should centre on the importance of maximizing the educational experience through continual class delivery improvement.

5. Class Recordings

The University is committed to providing accessibility and flexibility for student learning and seeks to foster knowledge creation and innovation. Recording of lectures and other classroom activities can contribute to these goals.

Classes at the University may be recorded for learning or research purposes, subject to the regulations and procedures stated in this policy.

With permission of instructors, presenters, and students, and following the procedures listed below, the University supports and encourages the audio and video recording of lectures and other learning activities for purposes of teaching, learning and research.

5.1 Privacy, permission and consent:
The classroom is considered to be a private space accessible only by members of a class, where student and instructor alike can expect to interact in a safe and supportive environment. Recording of lectures or other classroom activities should not infringe on privacy rights of individuals.

5.2 Intellectual property and copyright:
Class recordings are normally the intellectual property of the person who has made the presentation in the class. Ordinarily, this person would be the instructor. Copyright provides presenters with the legal right to control the use of their own creations. Class recordings may not be copied, reproduced, redistributed, or edited by anyone without permission of the presenter except as allowed under law.

5.3 Accommodation for students with disabilities:
When an accommodation for recording lectures or classroom activities is authorized by Disability Services for Students, an instructor must permit an authorized student to record classroom activity; only the student with the accommodation would have access to this recording.

5.4 Definitions:

Definition of “presenter”:
For the purposes of this section, a presenter is defined as any individual who by arrangement of the class instructor will provide instruction to students in the class. In addition to the class instructor, presenters might include guest lecturers, students, tutorial leaders, laboratory instructors, clinical supervisors, teacher trainers, and so forth.

Definition of “classroom”:
For the purposes of this section, a classroom is defined as any room or virtual location where students are directed to meet as part of class requirements. This includes tutorials, laboratories and web-conferences which are required elements of a class, but does not include study groups and other voluntary student activities.

Definition of “learning activities”:
For the purposes of this section, a learning activity is any gathering of students and instructors which is required as part of the class requirements, such as a laboratory, seminar, tutorial and so forth.

5.5 Responsibilities of instructors and presenters:

For purposes of teaching, research or evaluation, instructors may record lectures and other learning activities in courses with permission from the presenters.

Notification of intent to record classroom sessions should be included in the class syllabus and, where possible, in the catalogue description of the course. If not so noted, permission from students will be obtained prior to making recordings for teaching or research where a student’s image or voice may be recorded.

If such permission is refused by a student, the instructor will arrange for that student’s image or voice not to be included in the recording.

5.6 Responsibilities of students:

Student use of personal recording devices of any type during lectures or other classroom learning activities requires consent of the instructor

A student may record lectures without such permission only if the Disability Services for Students office has approved this accommodation for the student. The instructor will be notified of this accommodation. Such recordings would not be shared, and would be deleted at the conclusion of the class.

5.7 Restrictions on use of classroom recordings:

The use of recordings of classroom activities is restricted to use for teaching, learning and research.

Students may not distribute classroom recordings to anyone outside the class without permission of the instructor.

Instructors may use recordings for purposes of research, teaching evaluation, student evaluation and other activities related to teaching, learning and research. With permission of the instructor, presenters may also use recordings for such purposes.

Recordings of classroom sessions may not be used in the formal evaluation of an instructor’s teaching.

5.8 Storage, Archiving, and Permission to Use:

Permission for any use of a recording of class and other learning activities remains with the instructor after the class term is ended. In a case where the instructor is no longer available to give permission for use of a recording, the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized colleges, can authorize such use only for purposes of teaching, learning, and research. 

Students may retain recordings of classes and other learning activities solely for personal review and not for redistribution.

5.9 Special circumstances: clinics, training, art classes:

Recordings of learning activities such as clinical or training experiences involving patients and/or professional staff outside of university classrooms will be based on professional standards and on the policies of the clinical institution. In art classes, written permission of models is also required before any video recording by instructors or students takes place.

Section II. Assessment of Students

6.    Grading System

6.1 Fairness:                                      

Students need to be assured of fairness and transparency in grading. 

University:

The University shall periodically review methods of student assessment, and shall include student consultation when doing so.

College:

Each College will set out regulations and guidelines governing methods of assessment permitted, final or any other examination requirements, including whether a student may obtain credit for a class even if the final examination is not written, and any limits on the relative weighting of final examinations or any other term work.

Each College should establish adequate procedures for setting these guidelines and assessing applications for exceptions.

Department:

Departments and non-departmentalized Colleges shall periodically discuss grading patterns and trends and reach a common understanding about what appropriate grades at all levels of their discipline should be.  It is the responsibility of the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, to ensure that grading is fair and transparent.

Appeal:

A student who is dissatisfied with the assessment of their  work or performance in any aspect of class work, including a mid-term or final examination, shall follow the procedures set out in the University Council policy on  Student Appeals of Evaluation, Grading and Academic Standing and the Procedures for Student Appeals in Academic Matters.

6.2 Weighting in class grades:         

Timely feedback is an important part of the educational experience.  Assignments will be assessed and returned to students in a timely manner.

Each assignment and examination will be scheduled according to information provided in the class syllabus unless otherwise agreed by the instructor and students. 

The relevant weight of assignments and examinations in determining the final grades will be specified on the class syllabus.  The weighting of individual questions on any examination also needs to be specified as part of the examination.

The class syllabus will specify whether any or all of the assignments and examinations are mandatory for obtaining a passing final grade in the class.

6.3 Grade descriptors:                    

The University’s implementation of the percentage system for reporting final grades was approved by University Council in 1986.  University grade descriptors and percentage system apply unless separate approved College regulations exist.      

Definitions:

Percentage assessment for undergraduate courses is based on the literal descriptors, below, to provide consistency in grading among Colleges. 

The University-wide relationship between literal descriptors and percentage scores for undergraduate courses is as follows:

90-100 Exceptional

A superior performance with consistent strong evidence of

  • a comprehensive, incisive grasp of the subject matter;
  • an ability to make insightful critical evaluation of the material given;
  • an exceptional capacity for original, creative and/or logical thinking;
  • an excellent ability to organize, to analyze, to synthesize, to integrate ideas, and to express thoughts fluently.

80-89 Excellent

An excellent performance with strong evidence of

  • a comprehensive grasp of the subject matter;
  • an ability to make sound critical evaluation of the material given;
  • a very good capacity for original, creative and/or logical thinking;
  • an excellent ability to organize, to analyze, to synthesize, to integrate ideas, and to express thoughts fluently.

70-79 Good

A good performance with evidence of

  • a substantial knowledge of the subject matter;
  • a good understanding of the relevant issues and a good familiarity with the relevant literature and techniques;
  • some capacity for original, creative and/or logical thinking;
  • a good ability to organize, to analyze and to examine the subject material in a critical and constructive manner.

60-69 Satisfactory

A generally satisfactory and intellectually adequate performance with evidence of

  • an acceptable basic grasp of the subject material;
  • a fair understanding of the relevant issues;
  • a general familiarity with the relevant literature and techniques;
  • an ability to develop solutions to moderately difficult problems related to the subject material;
  • a moderate ability to examine the material in a critical and analytical manner.

50-59 Minimal Pass

A barely acceptable performance with evidence of

  • a familiarity with the subject material;
  • some evidence that analytical skills have been developed;
  • some understanding of relevant issues;
  • some familiarity with the relevant literature and techniques;
  • attempts to solve moderately difficult problems related to the subject material and to examine the material in a critical and analytical manner which are only partially successful.

<50 Failure

An unacceptable performance.

University:

The Registrar will record and report final grades in all classes on a percentage system unless an exception has been approved by University Council. 

All student grades in all classes must be reported according to procedures established by the Registrar. 

College:

Each College has the responsibility for ensuring, at the beginning of each class, that students are familiar with the assessment procedures and their application to the literal descriptors.

Department:

Unless approved by the College, all sections of a given course must adhere to the same system of assessment, either a percentage grading system or a pass-fail assessment system.

Exceptions:

University Council will receive and evaluate requests from Colleges desiring exceptions, such as pass/fail, to the percentage system of assessment.  Required non-credit seminar courses need not be referred for exemption. Examples are orientation courses, honours or graduate seminar courses, fourth year and graduate thesis courses, etc. Normally, formal examinations are not held in such courses and they may be reported on a P/F (pass/fail) or CR (completed requirements) basis. 

College of Graduate Studies & Research

In May 1996, separate literal descriptors were approved for the grading of classes in the College of Graduate Studies & Research.

6.4 Academic grading standards:       

College:

College regulations govern grading, promotion and graduation standards. Students should refer to the appropriate College sections of the Course and Program Catalogue for specific requirements or contact their College.

6.5 Average calculations:                     

Each College is responsible for assigning credit values to courses within its academic jurisdiction, in consultation with the Registrar, to ensure that consistency is maintained across the Course and Program Catalogue.

Calculation:

To distinguish whether these averages have been computed for the work performed by the student in a session, or in a year, or for his/her total program, the terms Sessional Weighted Average, Annual Weighted Average, and Cumulative Weighted Average are frequently used.  

Sessional Weighted Averages are calculated from classes taken in Fall and Winter Terms, Annual Weighted Averages are calculated from all classes taken in a year, and Cumulative Weighted Averages are calculated from all classes taken at the University.

Weighted averages are calculated by multiplying the grade achieved in each class by the number of credit units in the class. The sum of the individual calculations is then divided by the total number of credit units to produce the weighted average. Students should consult with their college for policies on repeating classes and non-numeric grade conversion.

Example of calculation of a student average:

Class                           Grade        Credit Units     Weighted Marks

ENG 110.6                  83                    6                      498.00

PSY 120.3                   78                    3                      234.00

PSY 121.3                   79                    3                      237.00                                    

POLS 111.3                89                    3                      267.00

POLS 112.3                92                    3                      276.00

BIOL 120.3                71                    3                      213.00

BIOL 121.3                73                    3                      219.00

CREE 101.6                80                    6                      480.00

TOTAL                      30                                            2424.00

Weighted Average (2424/30) = 80.80%  

6.6 Grading deadlines:                         

Final grades should be released to students in a timely way, both for the benefit of the students and to assist University business processes such as Convocation.  

Reports of final grades for all one- and two-term classes will be submitted and approved according to procedures established by the Registrar. For the purposes of identifying and advising first-year students experiencing academic difficulty, mid-year grades in 100-level six credit-unit classes held over the Fall and Winter terms are also reported to the Registrar and released to students. 

Final grades in all classes are to be submitted and approved:

  • no later than the end of the final examination period in a given term, for those classes with no final examination in this period, and for mid-year examinations in 100-level, two-term classes offered over the Fall and Winter terms; or
  • within five business days after the date of the final examination (not including weekends or holidays), for those classes with final examinations in the final examination period in a given term, as well as final grades resulting from deferred, special deferred, supplemental, and special supplemental final examinations.

If for any reason the above deadlines cannot be met, the instructor should discuss the reason for the delay with their Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges.  The instructor will also notify both Registrar and the students in the class as to the anticipated date of submission.

Colleges which use additional or different grade approval procedures, such as using a board of examiners, should arrange a grading deadline in consultation with the Registrar.

The Registrar shall notify Colleges of any final grades not submitted by the grading deadlines.

Students shall be notified of delays related to grade changes related to any other process involving grades, including those delays related to grade disputes between a student and an instructor or between an instructor and a Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized College.

University:

Only the Registrar may release official final grades. The Registrar will post final grades electronically as they are received. 

The Registrar will communicate with instructors who have not met the above deadlines but who have not notified the Registrar. 

Department:

Responsibility for submission of the final grade report is shared between the instructor, who submits the final grades, and the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, who approves the final grades.

If instructors wish to release or post any final grades unofficially, they should do so confidentially.   Grades should not be posted with public access.

When final grades are approved by the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, they will be submitted electronically according to procedures established by the Registrar.

Once submitted and approved, final grades may still be changed by the instructor.   Grade changes are also approved by the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges.

For off campus and distributed learning courses where the final examinations are submitted to the instructor through the mail, the five business day standard will be waived upon consultation with the Registrar.

7. Examinations                        

Students will be examined and assessed, either during the term or during the final examination, on knowledge and skills taught either directly or indirectly (such as through class reading assignments) on class materials covered during class presentations.

There will be alignment between class learning objectives and outcomes, instruction and the assessment plan for the class, of which examinations may be a significant element.  

7.1 Methods and types of examinations:     

College:

University Council, while retaining the final authority over assessment of student achievement, delegates to Colleges the responsibility of establishing general policies concerning the methods and types of examinations which may be employed by the College and the Departments of that College. 

Department:

Each Department should establish any further instructions and policies for its members.  Each Department will establish, within the regulations and guidelines set out by the College, examination methods and the relative weighting of final examinations. These Department limitations must be approved by the College.

Cross-college and interdisciplinary courses:

In courses provided by a Department of one College for students of another College, the examination regulations of the teaching Department will have precedence unless alternative arrangements have been negotiated between the teaching Department, its own College and the other College.  In the case of an Interdisciplinary program, the appropriate designated authority over the program shall approve any program regulations. 

7.2 Mid-term examinations and assignments:

Scheduling:

Mid-term examinations and other required class activities shall not be scheduled outside of regularly scheduled class times, including during the final examination period, except with the approval of the College.  For graduate classes, the College of Graduate Studies and Research is the approving authority. 

Any scheduling of mid-term examinations and other required class activities outside of regularly scheduled class times needs to be noted in the class syllabus so that students have fair warning of such scheduling. 

Any resultant conflicts with other mid-term examinations, other required class activities, or any other scheduled University business a student may be involved in will be accommodated at an alternative time through consultation between an instructor and a student.  Denials of such accommodation may be appealed to the Dean’s office of the College authorizing such scheduling, in consultation with the student’s College (if in a different College from that of the class) if necessary.

Number of examinations:

Students who have more than three mid-term examinations on the same day will be dealt with as special cases by their College.  College may establish additional regulations regarding the number of mid-term examinations a student can sit in any given period to time.

7.3 Final examinations:                        

a. Modification of requirement to hold a final examination      

Colleges determine whether students will be permitted to pass a class if they have not written the final examination. Colleges may allow instructors to determine whether students can pass a class if they have not written the final examination.  Any requirement that a student must write the final examination in order to pass the class must be stipulated in the class syllabus.

With the approval of the College and the Department, the final examination in a class may be replaced by an approved alternative form of assessment that provides a percentage assessment consistent with the literal descriptors.  The Registrar must be notified of all examination exemptions for classes scheduled by the Registrar prior to the beginning of a term so that final examinations are not scheduled for such classes and examination rooms are not assigned.

b. Final examination period and scheduling of final examinations       

Scheduling:

The Registrar schedules all final examinations, including deferred and supplemental examinations.  The Registrar will post the schedules of final examinations as early in a term as possible.

The Registrar may delegate authority to schedule final examinations to Colleges where classes do not conform to the University's Academic Calendar, or in such cases where Colleges want to schedule and invigilate their own deferred and supplemental examinations.

Change of final examination date: 

Once the Registrar has scheduled final examinations for a term, instructors wanting to change the date and/or time of their final examination must obtain the consent of all students in the class according to procedures established by the Registrar, as well as authorization from the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges.

Examination period:

For the Fall and Winter terms, the final examination period shall commence on the day following the last day of lectures for that term. 

Final examinations in evening classes will normally occur one or two weeks from the last day of lectures in that class except in the event of common examinations between two or more evening classes. 

For Spring and Summer terms, the final examination period shall consist of two to three days immediately following the last day of lectures for a class. 

Final examinations must be scheduled during the final examination period for a term for classes scheduled by the Registrar.  In very unusual circumstances, the Registrar may schedule a final examination outside an examination period on the recommendation of the instructor and Department Head, or Dean in a non-departmentalized College.

Duration:

Writing periods for final examinations usually start at 9 am, 2 pm and 7 pm.  Six credit-unit classes will normally have final examinations of three hours duration. Classes of fewer than six credit units will normally have final examinations of two to three hours. 

However, it is recognized that Colleges may authorize final examinations of different duration for classes if deemed necessary for pedagogical or other similar justifiable reasons.  Such departures from the approved time duration should be done in consultation with the Registrar.

Weekends and evenings:

Final examinations may be scheduled during the day or evening on any day during the final examination period except Sundays or holidays.  Where Good Friday falls in the Winter term final examination period, there shall be no final examinations scheduled on the Saturday following it.

Final examinations for day classes can be scheduled in the evening.  In the case of common examinations between day classes and evening classes, if possible the final examination will be scheduled in the evening.

24-hour rule:

The Registrar will arrange the schedule so that no student writes more than two final examinations in one 24 hour period.  

For example, if a student has final examinations scheduled in three consecutive examination periods - such as on Day 1 at 2 pm and 7 pm, and on Day 2 at 9 am - the Registrar will move one of the examinations. 

If a student has examinations scheduled only on two consecutive examination periods, with at least one period between examination groups - such as on Day 1 at 2 pm and 7 pm, and on Day 2 at 2 pm and 7 pm – the Registrar will not move any of the examinations.

Conflicts for common examinations:

Any student conflicts created by scheduling common final examinations between two or more classes will be accommodated by the instructors of those classes.

Warning about other commitments:

Final examinations may be scheduled at any time during examination periods; until the schedule has been finalized and posted, students and instructors should avoid making travel or other professional or personal commitments for this period.

Warning about withdrawal:

Students cannot withdraw from a class after the withdrawal deadline for that class.   

7.4 Conduct and invigilation of examinations:

All regulations for the invigilation of final examinations can apply to the invigilation of mid-term examinations.

It is expected that invigilators will be present while students are sitting for examinations, readily available to answer questions from students, and will monitor and report any instances of academic or non-academic misconduct according to the Regulations on Student Academic Misconduct and the Standard of Student Conduct in Non-Academic Matters.  Invigilators shall familiarize themselves with all related regulations and policies.

Invigilation:

Normally, the class instructor of record is expected to invigilate their examinations.  If the instructor is not available, in so much as it is possible it is the responsibility of the instructor and the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, to ensure the examination is invigilated by a qualified replacement that is familiar with the subject of the examination.  The process by which backup or additional invigilation is provided should be established by the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges.

It is recommended that a Department, or non-departmentalized College, supply a sufficient number of invigilators as is appropriate for the size of the class, depending on the nature of the examination.

Invigilators may use a seating plan for their examinations which requires students to sit at a particular desk or table.  In addition, invigilators may move any student to another desk or table in the examination room at any time before or during an examination.

Proctors provided by the Registrar in gymnasiums, for deferred and supplemental examinations, for examinations accommodated by Disability Services for Students, for religious accommodation, or by any other academic or administrative unit for any similar examination invigilation situation exercise the same authority to enforce these regulations as the instructor of the class.  However, in such invigilation circumstances, proctors cannot be expected to provide answers to questions specific to the examination in the same manner as the class instructor.

30-minute rule:

Students should not be allowed to leave the examination room until 30 minutes after the start of the examination.  The invigilator may also deny entrance to a student if they arrive later than 30 minutes after the start of the examination.   A student denied admission to the examination under this regulation may apply to their College for a deferred final examination; such application will be subject to consideration under the usual criteria for that College.

With the exception of use of the washroom, invigilators can, at their discretion, deny students leave of the examination room for a period of time prior to the end of the examination.  Students who are finished during this time should remain seated at their desk or table until the invigilator informs the class that the examination is over and they can leave.

Identification:

Students sitting for examinations are required to confirm their identities by providing their student ID numbers and names on their examination papers, and by presenting their University-issued student ID cards during the examination and upon signing the Tally Sheet when leaving the examination, or both.

During the examination, invigilators can require students to place their student ID card on the desk or table where the student is writing the examination, in plain view for invigilators to check.    Invigilators may ask for additional photographic ID if the student does not have a student ID card or if they deem the student ID card insufficient to confirm a student’s identity.

Students who do not present a student ID card, or other acceptable photographic identification, during an examination will be permitted to finish sitting the examination, but only upon completing and signing a University Failure to Produce Proper Identification at an Examination form. The form indicates that there is no guarantee that the examination paper will be graded if any discrepancies in identification are discovered upon investigation.  Students will then have to present themselves with a student ID card or other acceptable government-issued photographic identification to the invigilator within two working days of the examination at a time and place mutually agreeable to the invigilator and the student.  Such students may also be asked to provide a sample of their handwriting.  Failure to provide acceptable identification within two working days will result in an academic misconduct charge under the Regulations on Student Academic Misconduct.

If a student refuses to produce a student ID, or other acceptable photographic identification, and refuses to complete and sign the University Failure to Produce Proper Identification at an Examination form, the invigilator will permit them to continue writing. However, the student shall be informed that charges will be laid under the Regulations on Student Academic Misconduct and that there is no guarantee that the examination paper will be graded if any discrepancies in identification are discovered upon investigation

Invigilators need not require identification if the student’s identity can be vouched for by the instructor.

To assist with identification, students wearing caps, hats or similar headgear of a non-religious or cultural nature can be asked to remove them.

 

Invigilators are permitted to take a photograph of any student if there is any question about the student’s identity.  Invigilators should take a photo in such a manner as to not cause a disruption in the examination room and respects the religious/cultural beliefs of the student.  The Registrar will arrange for any photographs taken by invigilators to be compared to student ID photos of record.  Photographs will only be used for the purposes of verifying the identity of the student and will not be used or disclosed for any other purposes, and will be retained in a secure manner for a limited period of time period.

 

Invigilators are also permitted to take the student ID card of any student whose identity is in question. 

 

7.5 Access to materials in the examination room:

 

Students should bring only essential items into an examination room.  Personal belongings such as bookbags or handbags, purses, laptop cases and the like may be left, closed, on the floor beneath a student’s chair or table or in an area designated by the invigilator; coats, jackets and the like may be placed similarly or on the back of a student’s chair.  Students should not access any such personal belongings except with the permission of and under the supervision of the invigilator.  Students should not collect their personal belongings until after they have handed in their examination.  The University assumes no responsibility for personal possessions lost in an examination room. 

 

Students also shall not have in their possession during an examination any books, papers, dictionaries (print or electronic), instruments, calculators, electronic devices capable of data storage and retrieval or photography (computers, tablets, cell phones, personal music devices, etc.), or any other materials except as indicated on the examination paper or by permission of the invigilator.  Students also may not take anything with them if they are granted permission to leave the room by the invigilator.

 

For examinations requiring the use of a calculator, unless otherwise specified by the invigilator, only non-programmable, non-data storing calculators are permitted.

For examinations requiring the use of a computer and specific software, unless otherwise specified by the invigilator students may not access any other software or hardware.

No unauthorized assistance:

Students shall hold no communication of any kind with anyone other than the invigilator while the examination is in progress.  This includes not leaving their examination paper exposed to view to any other student.

7.6 Permission to leave the examination room:

Students who need to leave the examination room for any reason require the permission of the invigilator.  Invigilators may also use a sign-out/sign-in sheet for students who are given permission to leave the examination room and may record the amount of time a student spends outside of the examination room, frequency of requests to leave, etc.  Students must leave their examination paper, examination booklets, and any other examination or personal materials either in the custody of the invigilator for retrieval upon their return, or at the desk or table they were writing at, as per the invigilator. 

Normally, only one student should be permitted to leave the room at one time.  This prevents a student from discussing the examination with other students and enables invigilators to be aware of the whereabouts of their students. 

 

Invigilators may choose to escort students to and from washrooms at their discretion, and can check washrooms for indications of academic misconduct (e.g., hidden notes or materials, books or other papers, etc.).  Invigilators may designate a nearby washroom for use by the students during the examination.  However, invigilators may not deny students access to washrooms.

 

Students who have completed their examination are not permitted to leave the examination room until they have signed out and provided their student ID number on a University Tally Sheet confirming their attendance at the examination and their submission of the examination paper, examination booklets, and any other examination materials.

Emergency evacuation of an examination:

If the examination is interrupted by fire alarm, power outage, or similar emergency requiring evacuation, the invigilator should lead the students out of the examination room in an orderly fashion and keep the students together as much as is possible.  The invigilator should, to the extent that this is possible, advise the students not to communicate with each other about the examination and supervise the students until the resumption of the examination.  If the situation requires cancellation of the examination, it will be rescheduled by the Registrar at the earliest practical date and time.

7.7 Food and beverages:

It is at the discretion of the invigilator whether or not food or beverages are permitted in an examination room, unless required for a medical purpose.

7.8 Protocols for an academic misconduct breach:

Where there are reasonable grounds for an invigilator believing that a violation of the Regulations on Student Academic Misconduct has occurred, the invigilator has the authority to:

  • remove anything on the desk or table not authorized for use in the examination.
  • ask to examine any bookbags or handbags, purses, laptop cases, dictionaries (print or electronic), instruments, calculators, electronic devices capable of data storage and retrieval or photography (computers, tablets, cell phones, personal music devices, etc.), and any other personal belongings  if there is a reasonable suspicion that they contain evidence of academic misconduct.  If allowed by the student, any such searches must be done in the presence of the student; the presence of another invigilator as a witness is recommended but not necessary. 
  • once examined, any personal belongings (e.g. cell phones, text books and book bags) shall be returned to the student to be put back under the student's desk, with, in so much as it is possible, the evidence retained by the invigilator.  Notes or similar unauthorized materials will be confiscated and attached to the incident report to be evaluated by the instructor for possible academic misconduct procedures.  If the student requires a photocopy of any evidence discovered, a copy will be provided as soon as is reasonably possible with the original to be retained by the invigilator. 
  • the invigilator may also take photographs or video recordings of any evidence. Photographs or video recordings will only be used in support of a charge under the Regulations on Student Academic Misconduct and will not be used or disclosed for any other purposes, and will be retained in a secure manner for a limited period of time period.  
  • require the student to move to a seat where the invigilator can more easily monitor the student.
  • ask a student to produce evidence where the invigilator believes that student has hidden it on their person.  If the student refuses, respect the refusal but note it when reporting. Under no circumstances can the student be touched or physically searched.
  • if thought reasonably necessary, take a photograph of the student.
  • If the student refuses to cooperate with any request of the invigilator, note the refusal when reporting.

In all the above cases, the student is allowed to finish sitting the examination.  Any interaction with the student should be as discrete and quiet as is possible, so as to avoid disruption to the examination room; if practical, any conversation with the student should take place outside of the examination room.  If the student is disruptive, the invigilator can require them to leave the examination room.

As soon as possible, either during or following the conclusion of the examination, the invigilator is expected to:

  • make a note of the time and details of the violation, the student’s behaviour, and, if a student’s identity is in question, their appearance (age, height, weight, hair and eye colour, eyeglasses, identifying features, etc.)
  • explain to the student that the status of their examination is in question, that the incident will be reported, and that possible charges under the Regulations on Student Academic Misconduct could be forthcoming
  • identify  the student’s examination paper, examination booklets, and any other examination materials and set them aside
  • inform the instructor (if the invigilator is not same) of the circumstances and turn over all of the evidence available. In the event that the instructor is not available, the invigilator will inform the appropriate Dean.

7.9 Retention and accessibility of examination materials and class syllabus:     

All marked final examination papers, together with the University Tally Sheets, shall be retained in the Department, or College in non-departmentalized Colleges, for a period of at least one year following the examination period in which the final examination was held in case of student appeals under University policy.

It is recommended that examples of all final examination questions for a class, along with the class syllabus, shall be retained in the Department, or College in non-departmentalized Colleges, for a period of at least ten years following the end of the class.  Retention supports the evaluation of transfer credit for students.

For details regarding accessibility of examination papers please refer to the policy on  Student Appeals of Evaluation, Grading and Academic Standing and the Procedures for Student Appeals in Academic Matters. 

7.10 Retention of examination materials during the examination:

Students are not permitted to leave the examination room with the examination paper, examination booklets, or any other examination materials unless permitted to do so by the invigilator.  It is also the responsibility of an invigilator to ensure that no such examination materials are left unattended in an examination room before, during or after an examination.

7.11 Additional invigilation standards:

It is recognized that Departments and Colleges may want additional invigilation standards for their instructors or may require them to meet professional or accreditation standards, and that invigilation may be provided differently for online, distributed learning, or off-campus classes.  University Council therefore delegates to each College and Department the responsibility and authority for setting additional standards for invigilation appropriate to their College or Department and in compliance with University policy and federal and provincial legislation.

8.  Student Assessment Issues and Special Circumstances       

8.1 Final grade alternatives and comments:

Definition:

Course Grade Modes

  • Pass/Fail (P/F)
  • Percentage/Numeric
  • Completed Requirements/In Progress/Not Completed Requirements (CR/IP/F)

The following final grading alternatives within certain grade modes also exist:

  • audit (AU)
  • no credit (N)
  • not applicable (NA)
  • withdrawal (W)
  • withdrawal from audit (WAU)
  • aegrotat standing (AEG)

Final grades recorded as percentage units may be accompanied by the following additional grade comments as warranted:

  • incomplete failure (INF)
  • deferred final examination granted (DEFG)
  • special deferred final examination granted (SPECDEFG)
  • supplemental final examination granted (SUPPG)
  • supplemental final examination written (SUPP)
  • special supplemental final examination granted (SPECSPG)
  • special supplemental final examination written (SPECSUP)

8.2 Withdrawal:                          

If a student withdraws from the class after the add-drop deadline but before the withdrawal deadline for that class, the class remains on their transcript and is shown as a withdrawal.   

Withdrawal is a grading status alternative which appears permanently on a student's transcript as a W.

Withdrawal has no academic standing and does not impact the calculation of a student's average.  If a student withdraws from a class before the add-drop deadline for a term, the listing of the class is deleted from their transcript. 

8.3 Retroactive withdrawal:                

A retroactive withdrawal from a class can be granted when a student has received a failing grade in a class due to serious personal circumstances.  It does not matter whether or not the student completed class work, including the final examination, for the class in such situations.  As well, a retroactive withdrawal can be granted in situations where the student, or the University, has made a verifiable error in registration. 

A retroactive withdrawal from a class can be placed on an academic record by the Registrar, provided the student has applied for this change to the College in which they are registered, and the College approves this appeal.  Changing a failing mark to a Withdrawal removes these failures from the student’s average.

Such a change in an academic record can be justified only on serious personal circumstances (such as a mental or physical illness or condition, death of someone close, or similar reasons beyond the student’s control which prevented successful completion of the class) rather than academic grounds. 

Other procedures already exist for academic appeals, as described in the University Council policy on  Student Appeals of Evaluation, Grading and Academic Standing and the Procedures for Student Appeals in Academic Matters. 

8.4 Incomplete class work (assignments and/or examinations) and incomplete failure (INF):

When a student has not completed the required class work, which includes any assignment or examination including the final examination, by the time of submission of the final grades, they may be granted an extension to permit completion of an assignment, or granted a deferred examination in the case of absence from a final examination. 

Extensions past the final examination date for the completion of assignments must be approved by the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, and may exceed thirty days only in unusual circumstances.  The student must apply to the instructor for such an extension and furnish satisfactory reasons for the deficiency.  Deferred final examinations are granted as per College policy.

In the interim, the instructor will submit a computed percentile grade for the class which factors in the incomplete class work as a zero, along with a grade comment of INF (Incomplete Failure) if a failing grade.  

In the case where the student has a passing percentile grade but the instructor has indicated in the class syllabus that failure to complete the required class work will result in failure in the class, a final grade of 49% will be submitted along with a grade comment of INF (Incomplete Failure).

If an extension is granted and the required assignment is submitted within the allotted time, or if a deferred examination is granted and written in the case of absence from the final examination, the instructor will submit a revised assigned final percentage grade.  The grade change will replace the previous grade and any grade comment of INF (Incomplete Failure) will be removed. 

A student can pass a class on the basis of work completed in the class provided that any incomplete class work has not been deemed mandatory by the instructor in the class syllabus as per College regulations for achieving a passing grade. 

College of Graduate Studies and Research

The College of Graduate Studies and Research, which has higher passing grade thresholds for its programs than do undergraduate courses, will designate a final failing grade of 59 % to be assigned along with a grade comment of INF (Incomplete Failure) if the student could otherwise pass the class.

8.5 Deferred final examinations:          

A deferred or special deferred final examination may be granted to a student.

Examination Period:

The deferred and supplemental examination periods are as follows:

  • Fall term classes, the four business days of the February midterm break;
  • Fall and Winter two-term classes and Winter term classes, the five business days following the second Thursday in June;
  • Spring and Summer term classes, the first or second Saturday following the start of classes in September.

The Registrar may delegate authority to schedule final examinations to Colleges where classes do not conform to the University's Academic Calendar, or in such cases where Colleges want to schedule and invigilate their own deferred, special deferred, and supplemental examinations. 

Students granted a deferred, special deferred, or supplemental examination will be assessed the approved fee for such an examination.

College:

The College must consider all requests for deferred examinations and notify the student, the instructor, and, in the case of approval, the Registrar of its decision within ten business days of the close of the final examination period, and within ten business days of receipt of the application for special deferred examinations.  The College, in consultation with the student and the instructor, is responsible for arrangements for special deferred examinations.

A student who has sat for and handed in a final examination for marking and signed the tally sheet will not be granted a deferred examination but may apply for a retroactive withdrawal or a supplemental examination, subject to individual college policy and procedures.

Barring exceptional circumstances, deferred examinations may be granted provided the following conditions are met:

  • a student who is absent from a final examination for valid reasons such as medical or compassionate reasons may apply to their College for a deferred examination.
  • a student who becomes ill during a final examination or who cannot complete the final examination for other valid reasons must notify the invigilator immediately of their inability to finish.  The student may then apply for a deferred examination. 
  • a special deferred examination may be granted to a student who, for valid reasons such as medical or compassionate reasons is unable to write during the deferred examination period.  An additional fee is charged for special deferred examinations; otherwise, they are subject to the same regulations as deferred examinations.
  • a student must submit their application for a regular or special deferred examination, along with satisfactory supporting documentary evidence, to their College within three business days of the missed or interrupted final examination.

Instructors must provide deferred examinations to the Registrar at least five business days prior to the start of the deferred examination period.

Once the examination is written, the instructor will assign a revised final percentage grade.  The grade comment of DEFG (Deferred Final Examination Granted) or SPECDEFG (Special Deferred Final Examination Granted) will be removed from a student’s official record.  If the examination is not written, the original grade/grade comment submitted by the instructor will stand.

A deferred or special deferred examination shall be accorded the same weight as the regular final examination in the computation of the student's final grade.

Exceptions:

With the approval of the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, and the consent of the student, the instructor of a class is allowed some flexibility about the nature of the examination to accommodate the particular circumstances which created the need for the deferred examination. The Registrar must be notified of any departures from the regular form of examination.

The Registrar may arrange for deferred and special deferred examinations to be written at centres other than Saskatoon.

Appeal:

In the case of a disputed final grade, a student is entitled to an Informal Consultation on a deferred or special deferred examination. A Formal Reassessment (re-read) will be granted upon receipt of the appropriate application.  For more information about Informal Consultation or Formal Reassessments including deadlines, please see the University Council policy on  Student Appeals of Evaluation, Grading and Academic Standing and the Procedures for Student Appeals in Academic Matters

8.6 Supplemental final examinations:        

A student who is assigned a failing grade in a class as a penalty for an academic offence is not eligible to be granted a supplemental examination in that class.

Examination period:

The supplemental examination periods coincide with the deferred examination periods.  Supplemental examinations resulting from deferred examinations will be specially accommodated. 

College:

Supplemental final examinations may be granted only according to the following conditions: 

  • in consultation with the Department concerned, a College may grant a supplemental or special supplemental examination to a student registered in the College. Within the limits defined in this section, the College shall determine the grounds for granting supplemental and special supplemental examinations and the criteria for eligibility. This applies to all students regardless of year.
  • factors to be taken into consideration for granting a supplemental or special supplemental examination include but are not limited to: the subsequent availability of the course or an appropriate substitute; the grades obtained by the student in term work; the weighting of the final examination in determining the final grade; the class schedule of the student in the subsequent session.
  • supplemental final examinations may be granted under regulations established at the College level except that any student who is otherwise eligible to graduate and who fails one class in their graduating year shall be granted a supplemental examination, provided that a final examination was held in that class. A student who fails more than one class in the graduating year may be considered for supplemental examinations according to the regulations established by the student’s College.
  • the student must make formal application for a supplemental examination to their College by the stated deadline of the College.
  • a special supplemental examination may be granted to a student who, for medical, compassionate or other valid reason, is unable to write during the supplemental examination period.  An additional fee is charged for special supplemental examinations; otherwise, they are subject to the same regulations as supplemental examinations.

Once the examination is written, the instructor will assign a revised final percentage grade. The grade comment of SUPPG (Supplemental Final Examination Granted) or SPECSPG (Special Supplemental Final Examination Granted) will be replaced with a grade comment of SUPP (Supplemental Final Examination Written) or SPECSUP (Special Supplemental Final Examination Written) on a student’s official record.  If the supplemental examination is not written, the original grade submitted by the instructor will stand.

Supplemental examinations shall be accorded the same weight as the original final examination in the computation of the student's final grade.  However, College regulations may affect how grades based on supplemental examinations are calculated.

Instructors must provide supplemental examinations to the Registrar at least five business days prior to the start of the supplemental examination period.

Exceptions:

The Registrar may arrange for supplemental and special supplemental examinations to be written at centres other than Saskatoon.

Appeal:

A student is entitled to a Informal Consultation on a supplemental or special supplemental examination. A Formal Reassessment (re-read) will be granted upon receipt of the appropriate application.  For more information about Informal Consultations and Formal Reassessments including deadlines, please see University Council policy on  Student Appeals of Evaluation, Grading and Academic Standing and the Procedures for Student Appeals in Academic Matters.

8.7 Aegrotat standing:                       

In exceptional circumstances, in consultation with the Registrar, a student may be offered aegrotat standing (AEG) in lieu of writing the deferred or special deferred final examination, or in lieu of a final grade.

Aegrotat standing can be considered provided the student has obtained a grade of at least 65 percent in term work in the class(es) in question (where such assessment is possible); or, if there is no means of assessing term work, the student's overall academic performance has otherwise been satisfactory; the instructor of the class, along with the Department Head, or Dean in a non-departmentalized College, recommends offering Aegrotat standing, and the student's College approves the award.

8.8 Special accommodation for disability, pregnancy, religious, and other reasons:      

a. Students registered with Disability Services for Students may be granted special accommodation with regard to attendance, availability of study materials, and assessment requirements (including mid-term and final examinations) as per the Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy.

Students must arrange such special accommodations according to stated procedures and deadlines established by Disability Services for Students.  Instructors must provide mid-term and final examinations for students who are being specially accommodated according to the processes and deadlines established by Disability Services for Students.

b. Students may also request special accommodation with regard to attendance, availability of study materials, and assessment requirements (including mid-term and final examinations) for reasons related to pregnancy.

The University of Saskatchewan has a general duty to provide special accommodation related to the academic obligations of a class to students who are pregnant, and students whose spouses or partners may be pregnant.  Students who are experiencing medical issues resulting from pregnancy may be able to arrange accommodation through Disability Services for Students.  Students can also arrange such special accommodations in consultation with their instructor, and can be asked to provide medical or other supporting documentation (for example, regarding prenatal or postnatal medical appointments, date of delivery, or confirmation of birth).  Denials of special accommodation by an instructor may be appealed to the Dean’s office of the college of instruction.

c. Students may also request special accommodation with regard to attendance, availability of study materials, and assessment requirements (including of mid-term and final examinations) for religious reasons.

Students must arrange such special accommodations according to stated procedures and deadlines established by the Registrar.  Instructors must provide mid-term and final examinations for students who are being specially accommodated for religious reasons according to the processes and deadlines established by the Registrar. 

d. Students who are reservists in the Canadian Armed Forces and are required to attend training courses or military exercises, or deploy for full-time service either domestically or internationally, may be granted special accommodation with regard to attendance, availability of study materials, and assessment requirements.

Student must arrange such special accommodations in consultation with their instructor.  A signed Student Permission to Travel for University Business form shall be presented in support of any request for special accommodation.  Denials of special accommodation may be appealed to the Dean’s office of the instructor’s College.

e. Students shall be granted special accommodation due to participation in activities deemed to be official University business. Such activities are considered an important part of student development and include participation in Huskie Athletics, University fine or performing arts groups, participation at academic conferences, workshops or seminars related to the student’s academic work, or like activities.  Travel time to and from such activities is also considered official University business.

In the event that such activities create a conflict with class work students shall be granted special accommodation with regard to attendance, availability of study materials, and assessment requirements. 

Student must arrange such special accommodations in consultation with their instructor.  A signed Student Permission to Travel for University Business form shall be presented in support of any request for special accommodation.  Denials of special accommodation may be appealed to the Dean’s office of the instructor’s College.

9.  Procedures for Grade Disputes        

9.1 Grade dispute between instructor and department head, or dean in non-departmentalized colleges:   

In the absence of any other approved mechanism to resolve grade disputes between an instructor and Department Head, or Dean in a non-departmentalized College, the following steps, to be completed in a maximum of twelve business days, shall be followed.  :

a. Members of each Department or non-departmentalized College shall agree ahead of time on a conciliation mechanism that the Department or non-departmentalized College will follow in the event of a grade dispute.

b. If five business days following the last day of examinations pass and the Department Head, or Dean in a non-departmentalized College, has not approved the grade report for a class due to a dispute with the instructor, the Department or non-departmentalized College shall immediately commence the conciliation procedure. The Department or non-departmentalized College has five business days to complete this conciliation process.

At this stage, students affected shall be notified of a delay in recording their grades.

c. If, after five business days the conciliation procedure does not resolve the dispute, the matter shall be immediately referred to the Dean, or the Provost and Vice President (Academic) in the case of non-departmentalized Colleges, who will set up an arbitration committee within two business days. The committee shall consist of three members: one member nominated by the instructor, one member nominated by the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, and a chairperson. In the event that one of the parties does not nominate a member, the Dean or Provost and Vice-President (Academic) shall do so. All appointees to the arbitration committee should be members of the General Academic Assembly.  The chairperson shall be appointed by the mutual agreement of the nominees for the instructor and the Department Head or, if the two nominees cannot agree, by the Dean. In non-departmentalized Colleges, the chair will be appointed by the Provost and Vice-President (Academic) if the Dean and the instructor cannot agree. 

d. Also within two business days of the failure of the conciliation process, the Department Head, or Dean in a non-departmentalized College, must list in writing what material was considered in conciliation. A copy of this list shall be sent to the instructor who must immediately report in writing to the Dean, or Provost and Vice President (Academic) for non-departmentalized Colleges, as to the accuracy of the list. Within the same two business days, the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges, and the instructor shall forward written submissions with supporting documents to the Dean, or Provost and Vice President (Academic) in non-departmentalized Colleges.

e. Written submissions and all supporting documentation considered in the conciliation (including the list drawn up by the Department Head, or Dean in non-departmentalized Colleges), and the response of the instructor, are to be forwarded to the arbitration committee.  The committee shall consider only written submissions and all supporting documentation forwarded during their deliberations.  To the extent possible, the arbitration committee will use the same relative weighting of final examination and class work as was used by the instructor in arriving at the final grades. 

f. The arbitration committee shall be given a maximum of three business days to complete its deliberations and reach a final decision about the disputed marks.  The committee can either uphold the disputed marks or assign new marks. Once the committee reaches a final decision a written report which explicitly outlines the rationale for the decision shall immediately be submitted to the Registrar, with copies to the Dean, Department Head (if applicable), and instructor.  Any grade changes required by the decision shall be submitted by the instructor and approved by the Department Head, or Dean in a non-departmentalized college.

g. If after three business days the arbitration committee has not submitted a final decision about the disputed marks, the Dean or Provost and Vice-President (Academic) will be notified as to the reasons for the impasse and the arbitration committee will be have two business days to resolve their differences and come to a final decision. 

h. If, after two additional business days, an arbitration committee cannot come to a final decision, the Dean, or the Provost and Vice President (Academic) in the case of non-departmentalized Colleges, will reach a final decision about the disputed marks based upon the written submissions and supporting documents.  The Dean, or the Provost and Vice President (Academic) shall immediately submit a written report which explicitly outlines the rationale for the decision to the Registrar, with copies to the Dean, Department Head (if applicable) and instructor.  Any grade changes required by the decision shall be submitted by the instructor and approved by the Department Head, or Dean in a non-departmentalized college

i. Once this process is completed, affected students who previously ordered a transcript can contact the Registrar whereupon corrected transcripts will be issued free of charge.

9.2 Grade dispute between instructor and student:

Students who are dissatisfied with the assessment of their class work or performance in any aspect of class work, including a midterm or final examination, should consult the University Council policy titled Student Appeals or Evaluation, Grading and Academic Standing and the Procedures for Student Appeals in Academic Matters.

The policies describe the process to be followed in appealing the assessment.  Appeals based on academic judgment follow a step-by-step process including consultation with the instructor and re-reading of written work or re-assessment of non-written work. 

Related Documents

There are no other documents associated with this policy.

Contact Information

Contact Person: University Registrar and Director of Student Services
Phone: 306-966-6723